Drums are probably the world's oldest musical instrument, originating from every country in the world. World Drums are considered percussion instruments, but since there are so many varieties of drums, they are presented in their own World Drum category which is further broken down by types of drums. Like other musical instruments, many world drums can be tuned to produce a specific drum sound. This site also includes drum acessories such as tuners, drum carrying cases, replacement heads for drums and instructional materials which teach you how to play various world drums. In addition to being an instrument enjoyed by both children and adults, drums make a beautiful decor item, and some drums have even been made into pieces of furniture as featured in the Recordings and Tables section.


     Ashiko

The Ashiko drum is an African style drum. The traditional wood from Africa which is used to make ashiko drums tends to crack due to variations in humidity. Ashiko drums offered here are made of rosewood in Pakistan or made of mango wood in India, providing a drum which is resistant to cracking due to humidity changes. This instrument category also includes goatskin and replacement drum heads, along with carrying cases for your ashiko African drum.



     Beaters

World Drums are played with the hands or with sticks, also referred to as beaters or tippers. Beaters are usually made of wood or leather and may include grooves, ridges or knobs.



     Bendir

The Bendir is a frame drum which originates in Morocco. Frame drums are among the oldest and most versatile of drums. Many cultures have frame drums: the Egyptian rik, the Brazilian pandeiro, the middle eastern tar and bendir, and native American versions.



     Bodhran

The Bodhran drum is a simple and very old type of drum known as a frame drum. Frame drums by different names are found in many different countries around the world, including Algeria, Morocco, China, Russia, and Egypt. Native American Indians also used frame drums. While most of these frame drums from different countries are similar in appearance or playing technique, Ireland's version, the Bodhran, has developed its own look and playing technique. To hold the Bodhran, rest it on your left knee with the head parallel to your leg. Tuck the shell under your arm so that you can squeeze the drum against your body. Be careful not to dampen the head more than necessary to hold the drum securely. Place your left hand against the back of the head just inside the shell to help steady the drum. The Bodrhan can be struck on the head or on the rim, producing a variety of sounds. Listen to the sound of the bodhran.



     Bongos

Usually played in pairs, bongos are found in many different countries. Bongo drums are typically held between the knees and played with the hands.



     Caixas

The new MEINL traditional Caixa is faithful to the classic Brazilian style where wo pairs of guitar strings span one of the thin synthetic heads, for a strong snare effect and a crackling bright fundamental pitch. The deep shell gives a stronger resonance. A second style of MEINL Caixas produce the classic bright and cutting sound with penetrating rim shots that these instruments are supposed to deliver. Its light weight yet solid construction makes it perfect for street Samba.



     Cajons

The cajon is a box-style drum, thought to have originated in Peru. Cajons have become an important part of world music of various cultural influences.



     Conga Accessories

Accessories for your conga drums includes: conga stands, replacement drum heads for conga drums, conga bags and carrying cases, conga drum tuning wrench.



     Conga Drums

The conga drum is tall and narrow, often held up off the floor with a stand, usually played as a pair. Each conga drum has a single head. The conga is derived from African drums made of hollowed out logs. The Cuban conga drum is typically constructed of staved wood or fiberglass.



     Cuica

The cuica is a Brazilian friction drum. Attached to the skin is a small stick, which is rubbed with a wet cloth. The friction causes the head to vibrate. The player can change the pitch by pressing on the skin.



     Damroo

The Damroo is also known as the monkey talking drum. This a two-sided drum with an hour-glass shape. The player holds the damroo drum in one hand and gives it a sharp twist with the wrist, causing the beads to strike the drum heads.



     Darbuka

The Darbuka drum is a goblet shaped, singleheaded, arabic hand drum similar to the doumbek. Our Darbukas are made of various materials including cast aluminum, hand hammered aluminum, and spun copper with hand etched designs.



     Deff Drum

The Deff drum is a circular frame drum. The frame is often decorated. Frame drums are among the oldest and most versatile of drums. Many cultures have frame drums: the Egyptian rik, the Brazilian pandeiro, the middle eastern tar and bendir, and native American versions.



     Dhol Drum

The dhol drum is a two-sided drum. Cords hold the heads taut and small rings around the cords provide a mechanism for tightening. The left head, dhamma, has a heavier sound. The right head is called purha. The dhol drum is beaten with slightly curved sticks.



     Djembe African Drum

The djembe african drum (also spelled jembe) originates in West Africa and has gained considerable popularity. The djembe is played using different strokes of the hands. This category also includes djembe carrying cases and djembe instructional materials.



     Djun-Djun African Bass Drum

Djun-djuns are an African style bass drum with two heads. The drum produces a clear, resonant, deep bass tone. We offer stave constructed djun-djuns made with strips of rosewood precision-joined for superior strength.



     Doumbek Accessories

Doumbek drum accessories include carrying cases and doumbek instructional books, videos, and CD ROM products. Also see the Doumbek category for ceramic doumbek drums, metal doumbek drums, and wood doumbeks, as well as replacement heads for doumbek drums.



     Doumbek African Drum, Small Ceramic

The Doumbek African drum is a goblet or chalice shaped drum originating in North Africa. Doumbeks in this group are made of ceramic and are small in size (diameters of drum heads are 8 inches or smaller). There are many variations of the doumbek drum and many similar names (also spelled dumbek, dumbec, doumbec). The doumbek african drum has a resonating sound due to the depth of the body. Please see the Doumbek Accessories category for doumbek drum carrying cases and instructional materials such as books, videos and CD ROMS to learn how to play the doumbek drum.



     Doumbek, Aluminum

The Doumbek African drum is a goblet or chalice shaped drum originating in North Africa. Doumbeks in this group are made of aluminum. There are many variations of the doumbek drum and many similar names (also spelled dumbek, dumbec, doumbec). The doumbek african drum has a resonating sound due to the depth of the body. Please see the Doumbek Accessories category for doumbek drum carrying cases and instructional materials such as books, videos and CD ROMS to learn how to play the doumbek drum.



     Doumbek, Brass

The Doumbek African drum is a goblet or chalice shaped drum originating in North Africa. Doumbeks in this group are made of brass. There are many variations of the doumbek drum and many similar names (also spelled dumbek, dumbec, doumbec). The doumbek african drum has a resonating sound due to the depth of the body. Please see the Doumbek Accessories category for doumbek drum carrying cases and instructional materials such as books, videos and CD ROMS to learn how to play the doumbek drum.



     Doumbek, Copper

The Doumbek African drum is a goblet or chalice shaped drum originating in North Africa. Doumbeks in this group are made of copper. There are many variations of the doumbek drum and many similar names (also spelled dumbek, dumbec, doumbec). The doumbek african drum has a resonating sound due to the depth of the body. Please see the Doumbek Accessories category for doumbek drum carrying cases and instructional materials such as books, videos and CD ROMS to learn how to play the doumbek drum.



     Doumbek, Fiberglass

The Doumbek African drum is a goblet or chalice shaped drum originating in North Africa. Doumbeks in this group are made of fiberglass, producing a light weight drum with great sound. There are many variations of the doumbek drum and many similar names (also spelled dumbek, dumbec, doumbec). The doumbek african drum has a resonating sound due to the depth of the body. Please see the Doumbek Accessories category for doumbek drum carrying cases and instructional materials such as books, videos and CD ROMS to learn how to play the doumbek drum.



     Doumbek, Mother of Pearl

The Doumbek African drum is a goblet or chalice shaped drum originating in North Africa. Doumbeks in this group are made of Mother of Pearl. There are many variations of the doumbek drum and many similar names (also spelled dumbek, dumbec, doumbec). The doumbek african drum has a resonating sound due to the depth of the body. Please see the Doumbek Accessories category for doumbek drum carrying cases and instructional materials such as books, videos and CD ROMS to learn how to play the doumbek drum.



     Doumbek, Wood

The Doumbek African drum is a goblet or chalice shaped drum originating in North Africa. Doumbeks in this group are made of wood. There are many variations of the doumbek drum and many similar names (also spelled dumbek, dumbec, doumbec). The doumbek african drum has a resonating sound due to the depth of the body. Please see the Doumbek Accessories category for doumbek drum carrying cases and instructional materials such as books, videos and CD ROMS to learn how to play the doumbek drum.



     Doumbeks by Remo

Remo has been known as the drummer's drumhead company for 50 years. Remo creates doumbeks made of various materials with beautiful finishes.



     Frame Drums

Frame drums are among the oldest and most versatile of drums. Many cultures have frame drums: the Egyptian rik, the Brazilian pandeiro, the middle eastern tar and bendir, and native American versions.



     Hudak

The hudak is a wooden two headed talking drum. The drum heads are held in place by cords. Hold the hudak under the arm and squeeze the cords to make the drum talk.



     Indian Kettle Drums

Indian kettle drums are called Nagada, Nagadda, Nagara, and Nagarra. These drums have a bowl-shaped body and natural hide heads secured with all-over leather webbing. The nagada itself has a rich history. It has been played in northern India for centuries to prepare warriors for battles. Adapted over the years as a source of entertainment, nagadas once were used to send messages of joy and emergency. Today Nagada parties are common, providing entertainment for villagers and visitors alike by a typically all-male troupe. Nagada parties include the fast beats of the nagada, accompanied by spirited singing from troupe members and dancing by younger members of the group.



     Jug Drum

Ceramic jug drums are played by rapping on the outside while covering and uncovering the holes.



     Kettledrums

Kettledrums are percussion instruments that consists of a bowl-shaped shell with a drum head stretched over the shell. The bowl is usually a hollow brass, copper, or fiberglass hemisphere. The drum head is made of a natural skin (although synthetic heads can also be used). The drum head is attached with ropes or adjusting screws to control the tension, which can be changed to vary the pitch. Ethnic kettledrums are usually played with sticks or beaters, although kettledrums can also be played with hands.



     Khamak

The Khamak is a two stringed instrument with the look of a drum. The Khamak is set up like a one-headed drum with strings attached to it which are plucked.  The Khamak is used in all Indian folk music as a rhythmic percussion instrument.



     Khol

The striking, unique appearance and sounds of the terra cotta Khol drum make it perfect as a gift. The Khol combines the earthy ring of a clay body with the slap and tap textures of patched goatskin heads for a sound that is one of a kind.



     Kids Percussion® by Remo

Remo drums designed for children.  Child size drums include bongos, djembes, kongas, toms and gathering drums. The bright colors and jungle scenes of the Rain Forest design draw the kids into an imaginary world.



     Madal

The Madal is a hand drum which originates in Nepal. It is made of wood or clay. Both heads are played, holding the Madal drum horizontally.



     Medieval Drums

Cylindrical Medieval drums have two heads, one with a snare. When the drum head is struck with the drum sticks, the snare adds a vibration, or rattle, to the drum's din. The Medieval style drums are made with two rope-tuned natural skin heads that are rolled and stitched with the snare on the top head. This style of drum is a traditional military drum with a long history. They were used to mark time for marching or to signal during confrontations. Originally such drums were fashioned from solid timber making them quite heavy. These modern Medieval drum replicas are fashioned from attractive half-inch laminates for strength and light-weight.



     Monkey Drum

The monkey drum is a two-headed drum which is played by quickly turning the wrist so that the beads strike the drum heads.



     Mridangam

The Mridangam drum is the principal drum used in the performance of classical South Indian music and dance. This instrument is a single piece of wood that is hollowed out and has playing heads on both sides.



     Naal

The Naal drum originates in India and is a wooden two-headed drum.



     Nagah Drums

The Nagah Drum is a two-headed frame drum from India with an attached handle. The drum is played with a beater with curved handle.



     Nakers

Nakers are small kettledrums with goatskin heads. They are tensioned by sinew that runs from the rim of the head to a ring at the bottom of the drum. Nakers are struck with beaters.



     Pakhawaj

The Pakhawaj (also spelled Pakhavaj) is a two-headed Indian drum, similar to the Mridangam. It is also referred to as Mardal, Pakuaj, Pakhvaj or Mardala. The Pakhawaj is used to accompany dance and musical performances. The Pakhawaj Indian drum is placed horizontally on a cushion, with the left hand playing the larger bass drum head and the right hand playing the smaller tenor drum head.



     Pandeiro Frame Drum

The pandeiro is a frame drum which is played with the hands. It often includes geometric decorations. Frame drums are among the oldest and most versatile of drums. Many cultures have frame drums: the Egyptian rik, the Brazilian pandeiro, the middle eastern tar and bendir, and native American versions.



     Rain Drum

The Rain Drum is a frame drum which sounds like rain and thunder when played.



     Renaissance Drums

Renaissance cylindrical drums have two heads, one with a snare. When the drum head is struck with the drum sticks, the snare adds a vibration, or rattle, to the drum's din. The Renaissance style drums have a tension rim holding the skin head, and the snare is on the bottom head. This style of drum is a traditional military drum with a long history. They were used to mark time for marching or to signal during confrontations. Originally Renaissance drums were fashioned from solid timber making them quite heavy. These modern replicas are fashioned from attractive half-inch laminates for strength and light-weight and mulberry top and bottom rings.



     Repiniques

A Repinique is a two-headed Brazilian drum used in samba baterias (percussion ensembles). It is used in the Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo Carnival baterias and in the baterias of Bahia, where it is known as repique. It is equivalent to the tom-tom in the Western drum kit. Typically its body is made of metal. The heads, of nylon, are tightened through the use of metal tuning rods. The instrument is about the same width as the Brazilian caixa (snare drum) but several inches longer in height and lacking a snare. It is held using a shoulder strap attached to one of the tuning rods. It may also be played with a pair of beaters made of several thin flexible rods bundled together.



     Slit Log Drum

The slit log drum produces various tones from the slits in the log.



     Standing Drum

The African style standing drum is one of the largest drums, and is played while standing.



     Stir Drum

The Stir Drum includes graduated tongues of wood which create the sides. The stir drum is played by using a beater in a circular motion around the inner sides of the wood sides. The stir drum is one of very few drums that has no drum head.



     Surdos Samba Drums, Aluminum and Wood

The Surdo is a large bass drum used in many kinds of Brazilian music, most notably samba. Surdo sizes normally vary between 16" and 22" diameter. Surdos may have shells of wood, galvanized steel, or aluminum. Heads may be goatskin or plastic. Rio baterias commonly use surdos that have skin heads (for rich tone) with aluminum shells (for lightness). Surdos are worn from a waist belt or shoulder strap, oriented with the heads roughly horizontal. The bottom head is not played. A typical Carnival samba bateria in Rio de Janeiro has three surdo parts distinguished by tunings (and, by extension, sizes of drum). Together these three parts create a distinctive pattern which propels and drives the samba.



     Tabla

The Tabla is a pair of drums. Each drum is played by one hand. The Tabla has become the percussion instrument of choice in North India. The Tabla is enjoyed by young and mature musicians, and is fun to play.



     Tabor Drum

The Tabor Drum is a two-headed drum played with beaters. The tabor drum sounds like a typical marching band drum with a rat-a-tat sound.



     Talking Drum

The talking drum is played by squeezing the cords, making a sound that resembles talking. The talking drum make a great BaWoA Whoo sound.



     Tambourine

The tambourine is a shallow drum made of a circle of wood with goatskin or calfskin stretched across one side. The tambourine also has small jingles or metal discs set in the wood. The tambourine produces sound when it is shaken, rubbed, or struck on the head with the hand or knuckles.



     Tar

The Tar is a hand-held drum which looks similar to a tambourine, but has no jingles. The tar is a frame drum. Many cultures have frame drums: the Egyptian rik, the Brazilian pandeiro, the middle eastern tar and bendir, and native American versions.



     Tasha Kettledrum

The tasha kettledrum is a copper drum played with two beaters. The shape of the kettledrum resembles a pot or kettle.



     Timbales

Timbales are shallow, single-headed drums resembling snare drums. They are typically tuned to a higher pitch. They are played with timbale drum sticks. They are played while standing, mounted on a stand holding two drums. Sometimes a cowbell is also mounted on the timbale drum stand. Players may strike the drum heads, rims, and shells to attain the desired sound and rhythm.



     Tubano and Cluster Drums

The Tubano drum is a Remo invention and an entirely new development for a musical instrument. Tubano drums have a cylindrical shell. Tubano drums are the preferred choice for drumming programs where students range in ages 5 to 85 and are very light and easy to store and maintain. Several tubano drums connected together are called Cluster Drums.



     Tupan Drum

The tupan drum is also known as the Davul, Tabl baladi, two-headed drum. It is played with beaters.



     Zarb

The Zarb drum is similar to the Doumbek, and is available in a brass body and wood body. The zarb is sometimes referred to as the Persian doumbek due to its origins and chalice shape similar to the doumbek.